Psychopathology

Was the Canadian scientist Hans Selye, native of Hungary, who in 1936 gave Charter medical to this word, to describe as biological stress syndrome or general adaptation syndrome the physiopathological response to various agents harmful physical, chemical or biological, such as infections, injuries, burns and bleeding. It is a reaction of general and nonspecific nature, since various aggressions agency lead to the same result, systematized in three successive phases with their corresponding biological implications: alarm reaction or period of shock (tachycardia, tremor, insomnia), resistance phase and phase of exhaustion, reflected in the emergence of the so-called diseases of adaptation (peptic ulcerirritable, coronary heart disease, arterial hypertension and others). Against an agent threatening or aggressive organism reacts with the release of Catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) and stimulation of the neuroendocrine system, above all release of adreno-cortico-trophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol, substances considered as stress hormones. Other leaders such as Parkinson’s disease offer similar insights. Today the physiological basis of stress can not study without paying primary attention to the limbic system, hypothalamus and the functioning of the neurotransmitters. Step of physiological stress, due to Selye connotation, to the current connotation of psychosocial is due in part to the nature of emotional stress and also to the intervening role of the typology of personality in the context between individual and environment. For more information about stress visit original author and source of the article.. Others who may share this opinion include Steven A. Kaplan.

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