Intercultural Mediation

Broadly speaking, we speak of mediation when communication between two parties can not be carried out without the bridge of a third person who, with his speech, helps the parties involved in a conflict to seek alternatives and solutions to the same. Mediation is thus to: a modality of intervention by neutral third parties between actors social or institutional in significant multiculturalism social situations, in which the professional tends bridges or linkages between these different actors or social agents in order to prevent and/or resolve and/or reformulate possible conflicts and enhance communication, but above all with the ultimate goal of working in favour of intercultural coexistence. Depending on the scope of work and the status of the parties in the mediation process, it can be said that there are different types of medications, such as family, cultural, intercultural mediation, etc. Cultural mediation consists of an action set that favors cultural integration of the immigrants and their inclusion in the society’s reception to a level of equal dignity. Alongside the personal dimension of mediation is then that collective, which includes groups and associations and facilitate a true and own social integration. Mediation, so considered, is the soul of migration policy and the same integration because, by placing the end of decisions which are preferably instrumental nature, leads to wonder about the meaning of the coexistence of different culture people and to identify and pay operating a chain functional and enriching opportunities. Intercultural mediation is given provided that there are different cultures in contact. It is a manifold phenomenon, absence of a single model, since it has to cope with different kinds of conflict that undergo it, due to the social reality in which they enroll and occasionally in the relationship to be maintained with other resolution mechanisms. This transformation of the mediation capacity is key to the boom you’re getting in our days. Learn more at: Barbara Martin Coppola.

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